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Home > All Articles > Travel > Mosquito Repellent Solutions Compared

Comparison of Different Mosquito Repellent Approaches

Thermacell Mosquito RepellentWhen you go on a camping vacation or just want to enjoy sitting outside in the summer, mosquitoes, no-see-ums, black flies, and other pests are a real nuisance and can spoil your entire evening. There are several products on the market that promise to keep them away, and it’s not always easy to make an educated choice between the different options. Some work, some don’t. Some are harmful to your health as well; some aren’t. We’ve compiled the following table based on personal experience and information found on the Internet.
Since it was new to us and it looks promising, we discussed the ThermaCELL Portable Mosquito Repellent in more detail in another article.

For information on the new breed of Solar Bug Zappers, you can read this article on Solar Landscape Light and Bug Zapper.


Comparison

From personal experience:

  • Mosquito repellents such as DEET that you apply to your skin: They’re very effective against mosquitoes, but you’ll repel most human beings as well; they’re not pleasant to apply, probably not healthy, and you’d probably want to shower afterwards.
  • UV lamps that attract insects and electrocute them: Tried those – result: mosquitoes 10, me 0 (that is, ten bites, zero dead mosquitoes). Mosquitoes probably can’t even see that wavelength. At least, they couldn’t care less about it. But they do attract other bugs, check out these solar powered bug zapper models if you are interested.
  • Ultrasonic repellents: Tried these as well. They’re not that ultrasonic that I couldn’t hear the sound myself. The device itself was just an extra nuisance keeping me from sleep while being bitten all over by mosquitoes that were completely indifferent to the sound.
  • Mosquito coils: When you light these, they start spreading poisonous fumes containing pyrethrins and other compounds that kill the mosquitoes. They’re very effective, but not very healthy, and they don’t smell too good either. If you need them, buy “serious” brands to make sure they’re at least tested for minimal health impact.
  • Vaporizers such as the Baygon Genius: Again, these disperse insecticides; these also need electricity – probably not to hand in your tent – and they’re not suitable for outdoor use.
  • Citronella candles: Cozy on your terrace, but probably more of a placebo effect than it is real repellent, if you ask me.
  • Thermacell Portable Mosquito Repellent - looks promising, give us a sign if you have a positive or negative experience.
  • Since it's technically not a repellent, we haven't listed it in the following tabl, but for use in vacation rentals the Tesa adhesive fly screen might be yet another alternative.
  • No personal experience yet, but the Mosquito Barrier garlic-based solution looks promising.

The following table helps you to choose what's best for you, considering the criteria that you value most.

Vaporizers
such as
Baygon
Genius
DEET
lotions

Ultrasonic
repellents

 Ultraviolet
electrocution
lamps
(zappers)

Mosquito
coils

Citronella
candles

 ThermaCELL Mosquito Barrier
 Effectiveness
indoors





 Effectiveness
outdoors






 Portable use







 Requires outlet





 Requires battery
recharge







 Degree of
harmfulness







 Unpleasant feeling







 Unpleasant odor







 Device cost






 Refill cost per hour








Enjoy the upcoming summer! Did they bite you anyhow? Despite all your defense barriers? Have a look at this lightweight and innovative solution to stop the itching.

Do you have a different personal experience with repellents? Let us know via a comment below.

 Other Anti-Insect solutions on Clever & Easy

Categories: travel

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Last Updated on Monday, 16 August 2010 14:41